After Canceling Controversial Deaccessioning, Baltimore Museum Receives Over $1M for Equity Initiatives

The Baltimore Museum of Art (BMA) has received three major gifts totaling over $1 million in support of its Endowment for the Future, a long-term financial plan meant to increase access and equity within the museum. The BMA had previously planned to fund many of the initiatives using proceeds from sales of artworks in its collection. When a proposal to deaccession a trio of modern paintings last fall came under scrutiny by local and national cultural figures in a controversy that roiled the art world, however, the museum reversed course only hours before two of the works were set to go under the hammer.

Thanks to a $1 million lead gift from philanthropist and collector Eileen Harris Norton, announced today, the Baltimore institution will be able to materialize many of its diversity, equity, accessibility, and inclusion (DEIA) programs without parting with the works by Brice Marden, Clyfford Still, and Andy Warhol that critics of the deaccession plan deemed “some of their most valuable.” (The sale of the paintings was expected to bring in a whopping $65 million.)

An additional $350,000 from the Rouse Company Foundation and $110,000 from honorary trustee Jeffrey A. Legum will be used to establish evening hours and implement immediate pay increases for hourly workers, from $13.50 to $15.

“I knew the BMA was unable to accommodate an increase in the minimum wage this year so I decided to help them until they could afford it,” said Legum, who served on the BMA’s board for 23 years, in a statement. “I am glad that so many people on the staff will immediately benefit from this gift.”

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