Week in Review: Voters Weighed in on Arts and Culture; Photographer Arrested by NYPD

Week in Review is a weekly collection of news, developments, and stirrings in the art world. Subscribe to receive these posts as a weekly newsletter.

Across the US, 2020 ballot measures included important questions on Confederate monuments, arts funding, and more. See how voters weighed in on the cultural sector in different states across the country.

Hyperallergic asked artists and other art workers to share their reflections on the voting process and the months leading up to a critical election.

Americans for the Arts sent a proposal to both presidential candidates for post-pandemic recovery measures, suggesting the deployment of cultural workers in fields such as community development, public health, and infrastructure.

Artists across the country phone banked ahead of the election on Tuesday, November 3. Learn more about the initiative, led by “Artists for Biden/Harris.”

Chae Kihn, an independent New York photographer, was arrested by New York Police Department (NYPD) while covering an anti-Trump demonstration on November 1. Video footage shows police tackling her to the ground. In a tweet, the NYPD denied that any journalists were apprehended, saying that those arrested were “verified to not be NYPD credentialed members of the press.”

The Biden-Harris campaign commissioned eight Black artists to create murals in their communities to urge participation in the election.

Four political artworks uplifting Indigenous narratives were distributed around the US as posters and stickers, and as large-scale murals and projections in cities across the US.

On October 30, Berlin’s Madame Tussauds dumped Trump by wheeling his wax figure out of the museum in a dumpster.

The research team Forensic Architecture and independent journalism collective Bellingcat organized a sprawling archive documenting police brutality at Black Lives Matter demonstrations across the US this year. They have now published it online in the form of an interactive cartographic platform.

Artist Ahmet Öğüt accused the Yarat Contemporary Art Center of using his work as a “propaganda tool” and demanded that the institution remove his work after it featured the exhibition banner for his show in a post using the hashtag #KarabakhIsAzerbaijan.

The National Endowment for the Humanities allocated $120,000 to restore and build monuments in the US. One grant will fund the restoration of a Christopher Columbus statue rolled into the harbor by protesters in Baltimore; another will fund the creation of a Frederick Douglass monument in New York.

Souls Grown Deep launched an unprecedented resale royalty program for artists, which offers living artists 5% — the highest royalty threshold worldwide — of the proceeds from secondary market sales, at up to $85,000 annually per artist.

Awards & Accolades

Zdenka Badovinac was awarded the Igor Zabel Award for Culture and Theory.

Transitions

Nayland Blake was appointed chair of the Bard Studio Arts Program, beginning with the academic year 2021-2022.

Christopher Y. Lew, Kristina Newman-Scott, Eileen Jeng Lynch, Hitomi Iwasaki, Matthew López, David Rios, Solana Chehtman, and Victoria Munro have joined the Virtual NYC Curator Collections initiative, organized by the Mayor’s Office of Media and Entertainment, the NYC Department of Cultural Affairs, and NYC & Company.

Brittany Webb was appointed curator of 20th-century Art at the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts.

In Memoriam

Marylin Bender (1925–2020), journalist and author who was the first woman business editor of the New York Times | NYT

Joan Bingham (1935–2020), co-founder of the independent publishing house Grove Atlantic | Publishers Weekly

Sean Connery (1930–2020), the first actor to portray James Bond | NPR

Nikki McKibbin (1978–2020), singer-songwriter and American Idol finalist | CNN

Elsa Raven (1929–2020), actress known for her role in Back to the Future | Entertainment Weekly

Week in Review: Voters Weighed in on Arts and Culture; Photographer Arrested by NYPD is from Hyperallergic, a forum for serious, playful, and radical thinking about art in the world today.

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